Political prisoners – May 2016

<< No 23 (212) 6 June 2016 >>

♦  86 recognised as prisoners of conscience  ♦

The Memorial Human Rights Centre considers political prisoners to be individuals who are serving a prison sentence, as well as those held in custody or under house arrest as a form of pre-trial detention. The criteria for considering persons to be political prisoners are published on their website. (The surnames are in Latin alphabetical order.)

There are 86 individuals named in the list we publish today [30 May 2016]. This list is far from complete. It includes only those individuals and cases for which we have managed to collect and analyse sufficient information for a convincing conclusion to be drawn about the politically-motivated and illegal nature of a criminal prosecution.

At the present time the list does not contain the names of a large number of people who have been deprived of their liberty, and whose prosecution contains indications of illegality or political motivation, but for whose cases we have either not yet received the required information, or have not yet fully analyzed the information.

Nine prisoners released, 45 names added

Since the publication of the previous list on 30 October 2015, 9 political prisoners have been released. Three individuals were convicted in the course of the Bolotnaya Square prosecutions (Andrei Barabanov, Denis Lutskevich and Alexander Margolin); one was the last political prisoner convicted in connection with the rioting on Manezh Square in 2010 (Igor Bereziuk). Environmental activist Yevgeny Vitishko; an ex-major in the Ministry of Internal Affairs (Igor Matveyev), who fought against corruption within the Ministry; and a climber convicted in connection with painting the stars on top of one of Moscow’s highest buildings in 2014 (Vladimir Podrezov) were all freed. The last of three Muslims convicted on charges of blowing up a gas pipeline in Bugulma,  Fanis Shaikhutdinov, was set free after serving a 10-year and six-month sentence, and, finally, Nadezhda Savchenko regained her liberty.

Only four of those released were freed before serving the full term of their sentence in prison: A. Margolin was released on parole; E. Vitishko and V. Podrezov were released from prison with certain restrictions imposed on their liberty; Nadezhda Savchenko was pardoned within the framework of a prisoner swap between Russia and Ukraine.

During this same period, 45 new names were added to the list. The new political prisoners represent a very wide range of groups that have become victims of political repression by the State.

The “Ukrainian trail” can be clearly traced in the following cases:- the Crimean Tatars Ahtem Chiygoz [13], Ali Asanov [5] and Mustafa Degermendji [15] ; the cases of the Ukrainian citizens Stanislav Klykh [39], Nikolai Karpyuk [33] and Sergei Litvinov [50] ; and the cases of Andrei Bubeyev [11], Darya Polyudova [66] and Natalya Sharina [73] that are linked to the authorities’ anti-Ukrainian campaign.

As previously, one of the most important goals of politically-motivated incarceration remains restriction of the right of assembly. In place of three Bolotnaya Square defendants who were released, two new defendants are now behind bars: Dmitry Buchenkov [12] and Maxim Panfilov [63]. Sergei Akhmetov [3] and Darya Polyudova [66] have also been deprived of their liberty on the basis of charges of taking part in public events.

The attack on freedom of expression and the dissemination of information continues, in particular in relation to the Internet: among those who have been put behind bars for trying to exercise this right are Bubeyev, Polyudova, Dilmukhametov [16], Zagreyev [85] and Natalya Sharina.

The means of unlawful repression provide an instrument for suppressing any kinds of civic activity that are displeasing to the authorities. For example, victims have included Ivan Barylyak [8] who defended housing rights and Sergei Nikiforov [59], who sought to protect environmental rights.

Perhaps the most widespread repressions have been seen with regard to Muslims who peacefully sought to exercise their right to freedom of conscience and association, especially those charged with membership of “Hizb ut-Tahrir al Islami”, an organisation banned in Russia as a terrorist organization. In the past 6 months alone, 27 individuals have been added to the list of political prisoners on these grounds, and still this group of victims remains the least fully represented on the list.

A total of 95 individuals have figured on our lists of political prisoners during this period. Their prosecution has been conducted on the basis of dozens of different articles of the Russian Criminal Code.

[Compare “Political Prisoners in Russia” (Inostrannyi Agent, December 2016)]

[For updates on particular individuals and cases: see Bashkortostan, 26 Muslims; Imprisoned activists; Foreign citizens; Imprisoned Bloggers; Crimean Tatars]

Eighty six political prisoners

1.Afanasyev, Gennady Sergeyevich (b. 8 November 1990)

A graduate of the law faculty of the Tauride National University [in Crimea], he worked as a photographer at the Stock Photography Studio. In March-April 2014 he attended demonstrations and rallies of supporters of a united Ukraine and participated in organising first aid courses.

He was sentenced [date] to seven years in a strict-regime colony on charges under Article 205.4, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participating in a terrorist group”), two incidents under Article 205, part 2, point “a” (“A terrorist act committed by an organised group”), Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 205, part 2, point “a” (“Preparing a terrorist act”), Article 30, part 3, in conjunction with Article 222, part 3 (“Attempting to illegally acquire weapons or explosive devices”). He has been held in custody since 9 May 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted in violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Akhmetov, Radik Mudarisovich (b. 18 September 1997)

A resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District], at the time of his arrest he was temporarily unemployed. He was charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparation to undertake actions aimed at the violent change of the constitutional order”) as a member of the Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami organization, banned in Russia. However, even according to the prosecution, Akhmetov did not take part in any violent actions. He has been held in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on charges of an alleged crime that had in fact not taken place, with violation of the right to fair trial and with disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Akhmetov, Sergei Vladimirovich  (b. 1 January 1976)

A resident of St Petersburg, he worked as an architect. He has been charged with crimes under Article 318, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Use of force not dangerous to life or health against a representative of the authorities”) during a public gathering in support of Alexei Navalny and Pyotr Ofitserov in Moscow on 18 July 2013. He has been held in custody since 22 November 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is based on charges of an alleged crime that had in fact not taken place, with violation of the right to fair trial and with disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Akhmetshin, Fanis Faritovich  (b. 2 February 1963)

A construction foreman, he is a resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He has been charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activity of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) and Article 30, part 2, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparation to undertake actions aimed at the violent seizure of power, and the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami, an organization banned in Russia. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts that Akhmetshin did not take part in any acts of violence. He has been held in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that had not in fact taken place, with violation of the right to fair trial and with disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Asanov, Ali Akhmedovich (b. 7 July 1982)

He is a resident of Urozhayne village in Crimea. Asanov has a higher education degree and is married with two preteen children. Prior to his arrest, Asanov worked as a sales representative. He has Russian and Ukrainian citizenships. Ali is accused of crimes under Article 212, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in riots”). He has been held in custody since 15 April 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that the prosecution was conducted in relation to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Bagavutdinova. Zarema Ziyavtudinovna, (b. 18 September 1968)

A member of the “Pravozashchita” NGO in Dagestan [North Caucasus], she was sentenced to five years in a general-regime penal colony on a charge of committing a crime under Article 205.1, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Inciting persons to commit a crime under Article 208 of the Russian Criminal Code”). Bagavutdinova has been in custody since 4 June 2013.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that her prosecution was conducted in relation to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of her right to a fair trial.

  1. Barabash, Kirill Vladimirovich (b. 21 January 1977)

Barabash is a retired Air Force lieutenant-colonel. He is charged with committing a crime under Article 282, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Organising the activity of an extremist organisation”), allegedly continuing, after a 2010 ban on the inter-regional public movement “Army of the People’s Will” “in connection with the implementation of extremist activity,” to organise the activity of the movement in the form of the Initiative Group for the Holding of a Referendum “For a responsible government”. He has been held in custody since 17 December 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted exclusively in connection with the non-violent exercise of his right to freedom of expression, on a charge of an offence that did not take place, with violation of his right to fair trial.

  1. Barylyak, Ivan Mihailovich (b. 19 February 1986)

A resident of Stavropol [North Caucasus], Barylyak worked as a locksmith while studying law extramurally. He has been sentenced to three years 6 months in a strict-regime penal colony on a charge of crimes under Article 213, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Hooliganism”), Article 116, part 2, point “a” (“Battery”), and Article 115, part 2, point “a” (“Intentional Infliction of Minor Injury”). Ivan was held in custody from 10 September 2014 until 24 December 2014, then under house arrest from 24 December 2014 until 31 August 2015. He has been in prison since the verdict on 31 August 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on grounds of violation of his right to fair trial.

  1. Bazarbayev, Marat Tukmurzavevich (b. 9 April 1976)

He is a member of the banned organisation Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. Despite the fact that the prosecution accepted that Bazarbayev did not take part in any acts of violence, he was sentenced to six years in a strict-regime colony with a further one year of restricted freedom and a fine of 150,000 roubles on charges of crimes under Article 205.1, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Incitement and other involvement of people in committing a crime envisaged under Article 278”), Article 30, part 1, (“Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”), and Article 282.2, part 2, (“Participating in the activity of an extremist organisation) . He has been held in custody since 31 July 2012.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted in relation to an offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to fair trial and with a disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the nature of the charges laid against him.

  1. Bobyshev, Syatoslav Vasilievich (b. 9 August 1953)

A professor at the D.F. Ustinov Baltic State Technical University (Voenmekh) in St Petersburg, he was charged with crimes under Article 275 of the Russian Criminal Code (“Treason”). On 20 June 2012 he was sentenced by St Petersburg City Court to 12 years in a strict-regime penal colony for allegedly passing China information about the Bulava rocket complex. He had been held in custody since 16 March 2010.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted in relation to an offence that had not in fact taken place, with violation of the right to fair trial.

  1. Bubeyev, Andrei Borisovich (b. 11 December 1975)

Born in Tver [Central Russia], where he resides. He has higher education, is married with two young children, and is temporarily unemployed. Taking into account time not served for an earlier offence, he was sentenced to two years and three months in a low-security penal colony under Articles 280, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Public incitement of extremist activity committed using social media networks”) and 280.1, part 2 (“Public incitement to actions directed towards the violation of the territorial integrity of the Russian Federation, committed using means of mass communication or electronic or social media networks”).

Earlier sentenced to one year in a low-security penal colony under Article 282, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Inciting hatred or enmity; or degrading human dignity”) and Article 222, part 1, (“Unlawful acquisition, transfer, sale, possession, transport or carrying of ammunition”). He has been in custody since 24 May 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was based on am alleged offence that had not in fact taken place, with violation of his right to fair trial and with disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Buchenkov, Dmitry Yevgeneyevich (b. 1978)

Buchenkov has a PhD in Political Science. Prior to his arrest, he was employed as deputy head of the department of History of Medicine and the Social Sciences and Humanities at Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University in Moscow. He is an anarchist and editor-in-chief of the newspaper Moskovskaya elektrichka. Dmitry is accused of crimes envisaged under Article 212, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in riots”) and Article 318, part 1, (“Use of Violence Against a Representative of Authority”) in the Bolotnaya case. Buchenkov was taken into custody on 2 December 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that the prosecution has been based on an offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Chiygoz, Akhtem Zevtullaevich (b. 14 December 1964)

A resident of Bakhchysarai [Crimea], Chiygoz has a higher education degree and is single. The closing indictment states that Akhtem has two citizenships (Russian Federation and Ukraine). Chiygoz is accused of crimes under Article 212, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Organization of riots”). He was taken into custody on 29 January 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that the prosecution is based on an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Dadin, Ildar Ildusovich (b. 14 April 1982)

A resident of the Moscow Region. Dadin is a civil society activist. He was sentenced to 3 years of imprisonment in a general-regime colony on charges under Article 212.1 of the Russian Criminal Code (“Multiple violations of the established procedure for organising or holding gatherings, rallies, demonstrations, marches and pickets”). Dadin was under house arrest from 3 February 2015. He was taken into custody on 3 December 2015 after the verdict.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted exclusively in connection with the non-violent use of his right to freedom of assembly, on a charge of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Degermendzhi, Mustafa Bekirovich (b. 22 May 1989)

He is a resident of Sudak [Crimea] and is single. Prior to his arrest, he worked as a sales representative. Degermendzhi has two citizenships (Russia and Ukraine). He is accused of crimes under Article 212, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in riots”). He has been in custody since 7 May 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that the prosecution is based on an alleged offence that did not in fact take place with violation of his right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Dilmukhametov, Airat Akhnafovich (b. 21 June 1966)

A resident of Ufa in Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District], he works as a journalist. He was sentenced to three years in a strict-regime penal colony on charges under Article 205.2, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Public incitement to acts of terrorism”) and deprived of the right to work as a journalist for two years after release. Dilmukhametov was under house arrest from 17 July 2013 until 16 January 2014. He has been held in custody since 12 March 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted exclusively in connection with the non-violent exercise of the right to freedom of expression, on charges of an alleged offence that had not in fact taken place, with violation of the right to fair trial.

  1. Faizrakhmanov, Danis Mirratovich (b. 4 September 1988)

He is a builder by profession, and a resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He has been charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparation of activities directed at the violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of a banned organization, Hizb ut-Tahrir al- Islami. This has taken place despite the fact that the prosecution accepts Faizrakhmanov has not taken part in any acts of violence. He has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted with respect to an alleged offence that had not in fact taken place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the nature of the charges laid against him.

  1. Fattakhov, Rafael Raulevich (b. 25 May 1980)

A painter and decorator by profession, he is a resident in Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in the activities of an organization designated by Russian law as terrorist”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparation of actions directed towards the violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts that Fattakhov has taken no part in acts pf violence. He has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is based on an alleged offence that had not in fact taken place, with violation of the right to fair trial and with disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Fattakhov, Ruslan Vakilevich (b. 14 November 1980)

A private businessman engaged in trading, he is resident in Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in the activities of an organization designated under Russian law as terrorist”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparation of actions aimed at the violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts that Fattakhov has taken no part in acts of violence. He has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was based on an alleged offence that had not in fact taken place, with violation of the right to fair trial and with disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Fazylov, Aramis Fanisovich (b. 21 July 1991)

He has worked in marketing and is a resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in the activities of an organization designated under Russian law as terrorist”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut- Tahrir al-Islami. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts that Fazylov has taken no part in acts of violence. He has been under house arrest and has been deprived of liberty since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution has been based on an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and with disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Galiullin, Rinat Faizullovich (b. 25 June 1978)

He is a member of the banned organisation Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. Galiullin did not take part in any acts of violence, a fact accepted by the prosecution. Nevertheless, he was sentenced to 6 years and 6 months in a strict-regime colony with one further year of restricted freedom and a fine of 150,000 roubles on charges under Article 205.1, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Incitement and other involvement of people in committing a crime envisaged under Article 278 of the Russian Criminal Code”), Article 30, part 1, (“Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power, or a change by violence of the constitutional order”), and Article 282.2, part 2, (“Organising the activity of an extremist organisation”). He has been held in custody since 31 July 2012.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted in connection with an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Gallyamov, Rustem Ravilevich (b. 10 August 1981)

Director of the Eko-Svetstroi company and a resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District], he is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in the activities of an organization designated by Russian law as terrorist”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparation of actions directed towards the violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This despite the fact that the prosecution accepts that Gallyamov has not taken part in any acts of violence. He has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is based on an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and with disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Garifyanov, Aidar Ralifovich (b.1976)

A resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District], Garifyanov was sentenced to six years in a strict-regime colony on a charge of involvement in the banned organisation Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami under Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 of the Russian Criminal Code (“Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”), and Article 282.2, part 1, (“Organising the activity of an extremist organisation”). He has been held in custody since 26 August 2013.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted in connection with an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Gaskarov, Alexei Vladimirovich (b. 1985)

Gaskarov has worked for a consulting company, and is an anarchist and anti-fascist. He was a member of the Coordinating Council of the Opposition. Sentenced to three years and six months of imprisonment in a general-regime colony, charged with committing a crime under Articles 212, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in riots”) and 318, part 1 (“Use of Violence Against a Representative of Authority”) in the Bolotnaya case. The charges were laid on 29 April 2013. He has been in custody since 28 April 2013.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted exclusively in connection with the non-violent use of his right to freedom of assembly, on a charge of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Gataullin, Rishat Razitovich (b. 14 April 1972)

A resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District],  he is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in the activities of an organization designated by Russian law as terrorist”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This despite the fact that the prosecution accepts Gataullin did not take part in any acts of violence. He is under house arrest, and has been deprived of liberty since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is based on charges of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Gimaletdinov, Ilgiz Failovich (b. 18 November 1988)

Has worked as a manager at SrubMontazh, and is a resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. Charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in the activities of an organization designated under Russian law as terrorist”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparation of actions aimed at the violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts that Gimaletdinov has not taken part in any acts of violence. He has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is based on an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and with disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Idelbayev, Rinat Vadimovich, (b. 27 December 1980)

A member of the banned organisation Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. Idelbayev did not take part in any acts of violence, something accepted by the prosecution. Nevertheless, he was sentenced to six years in a strict-regime penal colony with one further year of restricted freedom and a fine of 150,000 roubles on charges of crimes under Article 205.1, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Incitement and other involvement of people in committing a crime under Article 278 of the Russian Criminal Code”), Article 30, part 1, (“Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”), and Article 282.2, part 2, (“Participating in the activity of an extremist organisation). He has been in custody since 31 July 2012.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted in connection with an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and the disproportionate use pre-trial detention.

  1. Inamov, Azizbek Khalikovich (b. 9 April 1977 in Kyrgyzstan)

He is a Russian citizen and a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. The prosecution accepts that Inamov has not taken part in any acts of violence. Nevertheless, he was found guilty under Article 282.2, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Organization of activities of an extremist organization”), Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order”), Article 205.1, part 1, (“Persuading people to commit crimes under Article 278 of the Russian Criminal Code”). He was sentenced to 11 years in a strict-regime penal colony and fined 200,000 roubles. He was taken into custody on 7 November 2012.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that the prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trail and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the nature of the charges laid against him.

  1. Ismailov, Shamil Magomedrasulovich (b. 20 October 1973)

Born in Makhachkala [Dagestan, North Caucasus], where he lived. He worked as a medical doctor and was a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al Islami. According to the prosecution, he did not take part in any acts of violence. Nevertheless, he was convicted under Article 282.2, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Organization of the activity of an extremist organization”), and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order”). He was sentenced to 8 years in a strict-regime penal colony, with a further two-year restriction on his freedom, and fined 100,000 roubles. He has been held in custody since 13 June 2013.

Recognized a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was based on an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the nature of the charges laid against him.

  1. Ishevsky, Dmitry Vyacheslavovich (b. 1983)

He is a retired officer in the Russian armed forces. Ishevsky was sentenced to three years and two months of imprisonment in a general-regime colony on the charge of crimes under Art.212, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in riots”) and Article 318, part 1, (“Use of violence against a representative of authority”) in the Bolotnaya case. The charges were formally laid on 27 May 2014, from which date he was held in custody.

Recognized as a political prisoner since his prosecution was conducted exclusively in connection with the non-violent use of his right to freedom of assembly, on the charge of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Izokaitis, Anton Alvidovich (b. 30 November 1987)

A resident of Staraya Russ, a town in the Nizhny Novgorod Region [Volga Federal District]. Izokaitis was sentenced to two years in prison in a low security penal colony on charges under Article 205.2, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Public incitement of terrorist activity or public justification of terrorism”) and Article 282, part 1, (“Incitement of hatred or enmity, and degrading human dignity”). He has been held in custody since July 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Kayumov, Azamat Rinatovich (b. 30 September 1982)

He had worked repairing washing machines for a living and is a resident in Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in the activities of an organization designated under Russian law as terrorist”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparation of actions aimed at the violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. However, the prosecution accepts that Kaiumov has not taken part in any acts of violence. He has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was based on an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and with disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Karpyuk, Nikolai Andronovich (b. 21 May 1964)

A citizen of Ukraine. At the time of his arrest he was one of the leaders of Right Sector (a banned organisation in Russia). Karpiuk is accused of crimes under Article 209, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Creating a permanent armed group [gang] with the aim of attacking citizens and organisations, and leading such a group [gang]”), Article 102, points “v”, “z” and “n”, (“Intentional murder of two or more people in connection with the conduct of their professional duties, committed by preliminary agreement by a group of people”), and Article 15, part 2, in conjunction with Article 102, points “v”, “z” and “n”, (“Attempted premeditated murder of two or more people in connection with the conduct of their professional duties, committed by preliminary agreement by a group of people”). He has been in custody since 21 March 2014 (actually not at liberty since 17 March 2014). Karpiuk has been sentensed to 22,5 years in prison.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is conducted with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Kashapov, Rafis Rafailovich (b. 2 July 1958)

At the time of his arrest he lived in the town of Naberezhnye Chelny [Tatarstan, Volga Federal District] and was chair of the Naberezhnye Chelny branch of the Tatar Public Centre. He is accused of committing a crime under Article 282, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Incitement of hatred or enmity, thereby degrading human dignity”). He has been in custody since 28 December 2014, awaiting trial.

Recognized as a political prisoner since his prosecution is being conducted in connection with an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Kazikhanov, Bagir Kurbanovich (b. 9 September 1983)

At the moment of his arrest he was living in Ulyanovsk [Southern Russia//]. Not officially employed, he worked at a vegetable depot in Ulyanovsk. He is a Muslim. Kazikhanov was sentenced to three years and six months in a general-regime penal colony on a charge under Article 282.2, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Organising the activity of a banned religious society”). He is charged with creating a cell of the religious society “Nurdzhular” (banned in Russia) by way of studying the Turkish theologian Bediuzzaman Said Nursi. From 10 April to 24 October 2014 he was in a pre-trial detention centre, then until 25 February 2015 he was held under house arrest. After that he was taken into custody.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted in relation to an alleged offence that in fact did not take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Khamadeyev, Alexei Alfritovich (b. 1982)

He was a resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District] at the time of his arrest. Khamadayev was sentenced to six years’ imprisonment in a strict-regime penal colony on a charge of involvement in the banned organisation Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami under Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 of the Russian Criminal Code (“Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order”) and Article 282.2, part 1, (“Organising the activity of an extremist organisation”). He has been in custody since 26 August 2013.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted in relation to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with a violation of his right to fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Khamzin, Rutsem Valeryevich (b. 6 April 1972)

A businessman, he lived in Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in the activities of an organization that has been designated under Russian law as terrorist”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This has been despite the fact that the prosecution accepts Khamzin has not taken part in any acts of violence. He has been in pre-trial detention since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, taking into account the crime of which he has been accused.

  1. Kharebava, Ekaterina Zhorzhievna (b. 1969)

She is an accountant by education, and resided in the town of Sochi [North Caucasus] since the 1990s. Kharebava was working as a market vendor at the time of her arrest in 2013. On 14 November 2014 she was sentenced to six years in a general-regime penal colony on a charge of a crime under Article 276 of the Russian Criminal Code (“Espionage”). She has been in custody since 24 May 2013.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that she was prosecuted for an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of her right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Klykh, Stanislav Romanovich (b. 25 January 1974)

A citizen of Ukraine, a lecturer at the Kiev Transport and Economic College. Klykh is charged with committing crimes under Article 209, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participating in a permanent armed group [gang] and in the attacks committed by it”), Article 102, points “v”, “z” and “n” (“Intentional murder of two or more people in connection with the conduct of their professional duties, committed by preliminary agreement by a group of people”), and Article 15, pt. 2, in conjunction with Article 2012, points “v”, “z” and “n,” (“Attempted premediated murder of two or more people in connection with the conduct of their professional duties, committed by preliminary agreement by a group of people”). He was taken into custody by a court decision on 22 August 2014 (but in fact not at liberty since 8 August 2014). Klykh has been sentensed to 20 years in prison.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Kolchenko, Alexander Alexanderovich (b. 26 November 1989)

Kolchenko is an anti-fascist who fell victim to an attack by ultra-rightists. He worked as a loader at the post office and a print shop, while taking a degree-level correspondence in geography. Kolchenko was sentenced to 10 years in a strict-regime penal colony under Article 205.4, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“A terrorist act committed by an organised group”). He has been held in custody since 16 May 2014.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Kornev, Alexander Valeryevich (b. 22 September 1987)

He is a member of staff at the Institute for the Development of Education of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated under Russian law as terrorist”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing activities aimed at the violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts that Kornev has not taken any part in acts of violence. He has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the offence with which he has been charged.

  1. Kostenko, Aleksander Fedorovich (b. 10 March 1986)

He is a former employee of the Kiev district branch of the Ukrainian Interior Ministry in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea in the city of Simferopol. Kostenko was sentenced to three years and 11 months imprisonment on a charge of crimes under Article 115, part 2, point “b”, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Deliberate causing of minor harm to health resulting in shortterm decline in health, committed for reasons of ideological hatred or enmity”) and Article 222, part 1, (“Illegal possession and carrying of a firearm and ammunition”). He has been held in custody since 6 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Kravtsov, Gennady Nikolaevich (b. 30 October 1968)

He lives in the city of Moscow and worked as chief designer at an IT company. He was sentenced to 14 years in prison in a strict-regime penal colony on a charge of committing a crime under Article 275 of the Russian Criminal Code (“Treason”). He has been in custody since 27 May 2014.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted with regard to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Krivov, Sergei Vladimirovich

Has a PhD in applied science and is a member of the RPR-PARNAS party. Krivov was sentenced to three years and nine months of imprisonment in a general-regime penal colony under Article 212, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participating in riots”) and Article 318, part 1, (“Use of force not dangerous to life or health in relation to a representative of the authorities”) in the Bolotnaya case. The charges were laid on 19 October 2012. He has been in custody since 18 October 2012.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted exclusively in connection with the non-violent use of his right to freedom of assembly, on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Kudayev, Rasul Vladimirovich (b. 23 January 1978)

He was living in the village of Khasanya near the city of Nalchik [Kabardino-Balkaria, North Caucasus] at the time of his arrest. He was charged with crimes under the following Articles of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation:

  • Article 105, points “a”, “e”, “zh” and “z”, (“Murder of two or more persons by generally dangerous means by an organized group for purposes of self-interest related to banditry”);
  • Article 166, part 4 (“Unlawful control of motor vehicles without intending to commit theft committed by an organized group by use of force dangerous to life and health, and also with the threat of using such force”);
  • Article 205, part 3 (“Terrorist act using firearms committed by an organized group resulting in serious consequences”);
  • Article 209, part 2 (“Participation in a band created for the purposes of attacking citizens and organizations, and in the attacks carried out by the band”), Article 210, part 2 (“Participation in a criminal group”);
  • Article 222, part 3 (“Unlawful acquisition, transfer, possession, transport or carrying of firearms, their principal components, ammunition, explosives and explosive mechanisms committed by an organized group”);
  • Article 30, part 2 and Article 226, part 4, points “a” and “b” (“Attempt to steal firearms and ammunition committed by an organized group using force dangerous to life and health, and also with the threat of using such force”);
  • Article 226, part 4, points “a” and “b” (“Theft of firearms and ammunition committed by an organized group by using force dangerous to life and health, and also with the threat of using such force”);
  • Article 279 (“Active participation in an armed mutiny with the aim of changing by violence the constitutional order of the Russian Federation, or violating the territorial integrity of the Russian Federation”);
  • and Article 317 (“Attempt on the life of law enforcement officers or military service personnel”).

Kudayev was sentenced on 21 December 2014 to life imprisonment in a general-regime penal colony. He had been held in custody since 2 October 2005 in connection with his supposed participation in the 13 October 2005 assault on Nalchik.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted in relation to an alleged offence that had in fact been committed by another person, with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Kulagin, Yevgeny Viktorovich (b. 1981)

He is a resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. Kulagin was sentenced on a charge of involvement in the banned organisation Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami under Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 of the Russian Criminal Code (““Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power, or the change by force in the constitutional order”), and Article 282.2, part 1 (“Organising the activity of an extremist organisation”) to seven years in a strict-regime penal colony. He has been in custody since 26 August 2013.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Kurbanov, Saipula Dzhabrailovich (b. 9 April 1980)

Born in Makhachkala [Dagestan, North Caucasus] where he lived. He worked as general director of a dentistry clinic, EstDental, and was a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al Islami. The prosecution accepted that Kurbanov did not take part in any violent actions. Nonetheless, he was found guilty under Article 282.2, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Organizing the activities of a banned organization”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing a violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order of the Russian Federation”). He was sentenced to 8 years in a strict-regime penal colony to be followed by two years of restricted liberty and a fine of 150,000 roubles. He has been in custody since 7 November 2012.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the offence with which he had been charged.

  1. Kutayev, Ruslan Makhamdiyevich (b. 20 September 1957)

A Chechen civil society activist, he has a PhD in philosophy. Kutayev was sentenced to three years and 10 months of imprisonment in a general-regime colony on a charge of committing a crime under Article 228, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Illegal possession or transport without the aim of selling narcotic substances in large quantity”) in a fabricated case after holding a conference, entitled “The deportation of the Chechen people: What was it and can it be forgotten?”, without permission from the authorities of the Chechen Republic. He has been in custody since 20 February 2014.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on charges of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to fair trial.

  1. Latypov, Rustem Maratovich (b. 17 February 1976)

He is head of the human rights organization, Centre for Research into Problems of Muslims, and a member of the Public Oversight Commission of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. Latypov has been charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at the violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization, Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This is in spite of the fact that the prosecution accepts Latypov did not take part in any acts of violence. He has been held in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Litvinov, Sergei Nikolaevich, (b. 9 March 1983)

//A citizen of Ukraine. Born in the village of Rastsvet, Stanichno-Lugansk district, in the Lugansk Region of Ukraine. He lived in the village of Kamyshnoe in the same district. A citizen of Ukraine, he has an incomplete secondary education, and according to his wife is almost illiterate. Litvinov was not conscripted into the army on grounds of ill health. According to the charges laid against him, he is not officially working, is not married and has no children. However, according to media reports, he is married and is bringing up a 14-year-old daughter. He was sentenced to 8.5 years in a strict-regime penal colony under Article 162, part 3, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Robbery, involving illegal entry to a residence, premises or other place of safekeeping of large or small size”).

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that the prosecution was conducted with violation of the right to fair trial.

  1. Maksutov, Radmir Iusifovich (b. 31 March 1984)

He worked as a domestic appliance repairer and is a resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at the violent seizure of power or the violent change of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts Maksutov did not take part in any acts of violence. He has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Mamayev, Rinat Mazitovich (b. 25 July 1971)

He is a manager and lives in Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) as a member of the banned Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami organization, despite the fact that according to the prosecution he had not taken part in acts of violence. He has been under house arrest and deprived of liberty since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution has been conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Mukhin, Yury Ignatievich (b. 22 March 1949)

He is a pensioner and has worked as a journalist and formerly was editor-in-chief of the Duel newspaper. Mukhin is charged with committing a crime under Article 282.2, part 3, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Organising the activity of an extremist organisation”), allegedly continuing after a ban in 2010 on the inter-regional public movement “Army of People’s Will” “in connection with the conducting of extremist activity” to organise the activity of the movement in the form of the Initiative Group for the Holding of a Referendum “For a responsible government”. He has been in custody since 28 July 2015, and since 19 August 2015 has been under house arrest.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted exclusively in connection with the non-violent exercise of his right to free expression of his opinion, on a charge of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to fair trial.

  1. Mustafayev, Farid Ramazanovich (b. 8 July 1987)

He worked in the transport business and lived in Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at the violent seizure of power, or the violent change of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami, despite the fact that the prosecution accepted that he had not taken part in acts of violence. He has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was based on an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with a violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Mustafin, Khalil Fanavievich (b. 18 August 1984)

He is a champion of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District], Russia and the world in Eastern single combat, and a skilled household appliance repairer. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at the violent seizure of power or the violent change of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb-ut Tahrir al-Islami, despite the fact that the prosecution accepts that he had not taken part in acts of violence. He has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution has been based on an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the nature of the charges laid against him.

  1. Nasyrov, Vadim Gayfullayevich (b. 17 February 1981)

He is a member of the banned organisation Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. The prosecution accepted that Nasyrov did not take part in acts of violence. Nonetheless, he was convicted under Article 205.1, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Incitement and other involvement of people in committing a crime under Article 278 of the Russian Criminal Code”), Article 30, part 1 (“Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”), and Article 282.2, part 2 (“Participating in the activity of an extremist organisation) and sentenced to six years in a strict-regime penal colony with a further one year of restricted freedom and a fine of 150,000 roubles. He has been in custody since 31 July 2012.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Navalny, Oleg Anatolyevich (b. 1983)

He is the brother of Alexei Navalny, and a former employee of the Federal Russian Post Office. Oleg Navalny was convicted on 30 December 2014 in the Yves Rocher case under Article 159, part 3, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Large scale embezzlement”), Article 159.4, part 3 (“Large scale embezzlement in the sphere of business activity”), and Article 174.1, part 2, point “a” (“Legalisation of financial resources acquired by a person as a result of a large scale crime committed by him”). He was sentenced to three years and six months of imprisonment in a general-regime colony and a fine of 500,000 roubles. He was in custody from 30 December 2014.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Nepomnyashchikh, Ivan Andrevevich (b. 1990)

He worked as a design engineer at the Rodina Scientific-Production Association, and is a resident of the town of Sergiyev Posad in the Moscow Region. Nepomnyashchikh was charged with crimes under Article 212, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Participation in riots”) and Article 318, part 1 (“Use of force not dangerous to life or health in relation to a representative of the authorities”). On 26 February 2015 the Basmanny district court in Moscow placed him under house arrest until 6 April 2015. He was formally charged on 2 March 2015. He has been in custody since 25 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted exclusively in connection with the non-violent use of his right to free assembly, on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Nikiforov, Sergei Savelevich (b. 31 October 1968)

Nikiforov lives in Ivanovskoye in the Amur Region [Far Eastern Russia]. He is married with five foster children. Nikiforov is a leader of the Evenk community. Initially, Nikiforov was sentenced to 5 years’ imprisonment in a strict-regime penal colony, a fine of 16 million roubles and a further prohibition on holding official positions in local self-government bodies for 2.5 years. He was found guilty of crimes under Article 290, part 5, of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation (“Accepting a large-scale bribe”) and Article 285, part 2 (“The use by the head of local government of official powers against the interests of the service for mercenary or other personal interest”). Later the sentence was reduced to 4 years’ imprisonment in a strict-regime penal colony, a fine of 3 million roubles and a prohibition on holding official positions in local self-government bodies for a further two years.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds of a violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Nurlygayanov, Rinat Ranifovich (b. 3 January 1991)

He is a student of the Russian Islamic University and a refrigerator repairer who lives in Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at the violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts Nurlygayanov did not take part in any acts of violence. He has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that he is being prosecuted in relation to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Osipova, Taisiya Vitalyevna (b. 26 August 1984)

She is a political activist who lives in the city of Smolensk [Central Russia]. Osipova is a victim of persecution by law- enforcement bodies as a result of her membership of the organisation The Other Russia. Osipova was convicted on 29 December 2011 under Article 228.1, part 3, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Illegal manufacture, sale or transport of narcotic substances in particularly large quantities”) by Judge Y N. Dvoryanchikov, sitting in the Zadneprovsky district court in Smolensk. She was sentenced to 10 years’ imprisonment. On 15 February 2012 her sentence was quashed by Smolensk Region court, and the case was sent for review. On 28 August 2012 she was sentenced to eight years’ imprisonment, although the prosecutor had asked for four years. She has been in custody since 23 November 2010.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that her prosecution was conducted with violation of her right to a fair trial.

  1. Parfenov, Valery Nikolaevich (b. 3 August 1974)

A resident of Moscow, he worked as a systems administrator in the Moscow Unified Energy Company. Parfenov [Parfyonov] is charged with an offence under Article 282.2, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Organising the activity of an extremist organisation”), allegedly continuing after a ban in 2010 on the inter-regional public movement “Army of People’s Will” “in connection with the conducting of extremist activity” to organise the activity of the movement in the form of the Initiative Group for the Holding of a Referendum “For a responsible government”. Parfenov has been in custody since 28 July 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted exclusively in connection with the non-violent exercise of his right to free expression of his opinion, in relation to an offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Panfilov, Maxim Alexeyevich (b. 1985)

He is a resident of Astrakhan [Southern Russia] and suffers from a neurological health condition. At the time of his detention, he was not working. He has been charged under Article 212, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in riots”) and Article 318, part 1 (“Use of force not dangerous to health or life against a representative of the authorities”) in the framework of the Bolotnaya Square prosecutions. He has been held in custody since 7 April 2016.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted in relation to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention in relation to the alleged offence.

  1. Parpulov, Pyotr Ivanovich (b. 1955)

Born at Khanskaya village in the Krasnodar Region [Southern Russia]. An air traffic control officer, since the 1980s he has worked at the civilian airport in Sochi, where he was working at the time of his detention in 2014, despite the fact that he had already reached pensionable age. Parpulov was found guilty under Article 275 of the Russian Criminal Code (“Treason”) and sentenced to 12 years in a strict-regime penal colony. He had been in custody since 4 March 2014.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted in relation to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial.

  1. Pichugin, Alexei Vladimirovich (b. 25 July 1962)

He is the former head of the department of internal economic security for the Yukos oil company. Two guilty verdicts have been handed down against him, in 2005 and 2007, under Article 162 of the Russian Criminal Code (“Robbery”) and Article 105 (“Murder”). He was sentenced to life imprisonment in a general-regime penal colony. During the investigation and trials multiple violations were noted which allow us to assert that Pichugin’s guilt was not proven, and that the evidence on which the verdicts were based was falsified. Pichugin has been in custody since 19 June 2003.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Polyudova, Darya Vladimirovna (b. 4 February 1989)

Born in the town of Kuvasai in the Uzbek Soviet Socialist Republic. At the time of her arrest, she was living in Krasnodar [Southern Russia] and was a Left Front activist. On 21 December 2015 she was sentenced to two years in a low security penal colony under Article 280, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Public incitement to carry out extremist activity”), Article 280, part 2 (“Public incitement to carry out extremist activity committed by using the Internet”), Article 280.1, part 2 (“Public incitement to carry out actions aimed at violating the territorial integrity of the Russian Federation”) in connection with her participation in the preparation of a “March for the Federalization of the Kuban” that did not take place. The sentence entered into force on 30 March 2016. On 20 April 2016 Poliudova independently arrived at her place of detention.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that her prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the nature of the charges laid against her.

  1. Rakhmonkhodzhayev, Zikrullokhon Faizullokhodzhaevich (b. 2 October 1975)

A resident and citizen of Tajikistan where he was born, Rakhmonkhodzhayev is a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. He was found guilty under Article 282.2, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an extremist organization”), Article 30, part 1, and Article 278 (“Preparation to seize power by violence or to change by force the constitutional order of the Russian Federation), Article 222, part 1 (“Illegal acquisition, transfer, sale, possession, transport or carrying of firearms, their main component parts or ammunition”). Rakhmonkhodzhayev was sentenced to 7 years in a strict-regime penal colony and a fine of 50,000 roubles. He has been in custody since 7 November 2012.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Razvozzhayev, Leonid Mikhailovich (b. 12 June 1973)

Razvozzhayev was a member of the Coordinating Council of the Opposition. After a screening on NTV of the propaganda film “Anatomy of a Protest-2”, Razvozzhayev was sentenced under Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 212 of the Russian Criminal Code (“Preparing to organise riots”) and Article 212, part 1 (“Organising riots”) to four years and 6 months of imprisonment in a general-regime penal colony and a fine of 150,000 roubles. He has been in custody since 19 October 2012, when he was abducted on the territory of Ukraine.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted in relation to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Reznik, Sergei Eduardovich (b. 10 April 1976)

A deputy director for public relations of the Rostov branch of the company ASK-Plus, as well as a journalist and blogger. He has been found guilty in two trials, the first on 26 November 2013 under Article 204, part 2, point “b” of the Russian Criminal Code (“Commercial payments, committed for the purpose of illegal activity”), Article 306, part 3 (“Deliberate false testimony about the commission of a crime, or the artificial creation of evidence of guilt”), and Article 319 (“Insulting a representative of the authorities”); and the second on 22 January 2015 under Article 306, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Deliberate false testimony about the commission of a crime, or accusing a person of committing a serious or very serious crime”), and two episodes under Article 319 (“Insulting a representative of the authorities”). He has been sentenced to two years and 11 months in a general-regime penal colony with a ban on journalistic activity for a further one year and 10 months. He has been held in custody since 26 November 2013.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted exclusively in connection with his non-violent use of his right to free expression of his opinion, on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Salimov, Artur Raulevich (b. 5 September 1986)

An electrician, he lives in Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”), and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at the violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. However, this is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts that Salimov did not take part in any acts of violence. Salimov has been held in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the nature of the charges laid against him.

  1. Satayev, Rasim Radikovich (b. 1988)

A resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District], he was sentenced to six years and six months in a strict-regime penal colony on a charge of involvement in the banned organisation Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami under Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 of the Russian Criminal Code (“Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order”), and Article 282.2, part 1, in conjunction with Article 282.2 (“Organising the activity of an extremist organisation”). Satayev has been in custody since 26 August 2013.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Sentsov, Oleg Gennadyevich (b. 13 July 1976)

[A citizen of Ukraine]. Sentsov, a film director and producer, lived in Simferopol and was an Auto-maidan activist. He supported the movement for a united Ukraine in Crimea in February-March 2014. Sentsov was sentenced to 20 years’ imprisonment in a strict-regime penal colony under Article 205.4, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Organising a terrorist group”), two episodes under Article 205, part 2, point “a” (“A terrorist act committed by an organised group”), Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 205, part 2, point “a” (“Preparing a terrorist act”), Article 30, part 3, in conjunction with Article 222, part 3 (“Attempted illegal acquisition of a weapon and explosive devices”), and Article 222, part 3 (“Illegal acquisition and possession of a weapon and explosive devices”). Sentsov has been in custody since 11 May 2014.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Sharina, Natalya Grigoryevna (b. 13 July 1957)

She is a Russian citizen residing in Moscow and director of the government-funded Library of Ukrainian Literature in Moscow. Sharina is charged with a crime under Article 282, part 2, point “b”, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Inciting hatred or enmity and degrading human dignity, committed by a person with the use of their professional position”) with regard to the presence of publications recognised as extremist in the library’s stock. Sharina is under house arrest while awaiting trial.

  1. Sharipov, Shamil Khazhgalievich (b. 16 January 1977)

He is a resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District] and worked repairing washing-machines. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”), and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at the violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut- Tahrir al-Islami. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepted Sharipov did not take part in acts of violence. Sharipov has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted on the basis of alleged offences that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, with regard to the charges laid against him.

  1. Shishkin, Vitaly Viktorovich (b. 6 August 1972)

He is a Russian citizen and an opposition activist of Russian nationalist persuasion. Shishkin was sentenced to four years in a general-regime penal colony on charges of committing crimes under Article 212, part 3, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Inciting mass riots”) and Article 282, part 1, (“Actions aimed at inciting hatred or enmity”). Shishkin has been in custody since 13 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted exclusively in connection with the non-violent implementation of his right to free expression of his opinion, on a charge of an alleged offence that had not in fact taken place, with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Sokolov, Aleksander Alexanderovich (b. 17 November 1987)

A Muscovite with a PhD in economics. He was employed as a journalist at RBC. Sokolov is charged with committing a crime under Article 282.2, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Organising the activity of an extremist organisation”), supposedly continuing after a ban in 2010 on the inter-regional public movement “Army of People’s Will” “in connection with the conducting of extremist activity” to organise the activity of the movement in the form of the Initiative Group for the Holding of a Referendum “For a responsible government”. Sokolov has been in custody since 28 July 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted exclusively in connection with the non-violent implementation of his right to freely express his opinion, on a charge of an alleged offence that in fact did not take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Sutuga, Alexei Vladimirovich (b. 24 January 1986)

He is a resident of Moscow and an unskilled worker who took part in the anti-fascist movement and political and environmental civil society initiatives, including as part of the anarchist movement “Autonomous Action”. Sutuga was convicted on a charge under Article 213, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Hooliganism committed by a group of people by prior agreement”). Judge Elena Korobchenko, sitting in the Zamoskvoretsky district court in Moscow, well known for her role as judge in the case of the Navalny brothers, sentenced Sutuga to three years and one month in a general-regime penal colony. Sutuga had been in custody since 5 April 2014.

  1. Tagirov, Irek Rishatovich (b. 5 April 1989)

He is a sales manager and resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged with offences under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at the violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts Tagirov did not take part in any acts of violence. Tagirov has been in detention since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted in relation to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Tikhonov, Leonid Ivanovich (b. 25 March 1963)

At the time of his conviction, he was a resident of the city of Nakhodka in the Primorsky Region [Far Eastern Russia]. Tikhonov worked as a docker at Vostochny Port, and has been the head of the professional committee of the Russian Union of Dockers at the Vostochny Port Joint Stock Company since 2003. On 15 December 2014, Tikhonov was convicted by Judge Maxim Mikhailovich Kiselev sitting in Nakhodka City Court on a charge of a crime under Article 160, part 3, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Acquisition or spending through the abuse of one’s position of employment, also on a large-scale”). He was sentenced to three years and six months of imprisonment in a general- regime penal colony with a further ban on engaging in trade union activity for three years. He had been taken into custody on 15 December 2014.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted in relation to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial.

  1. Tyumentsev, Vadim Viktorovich (b. 3 December 1980)

He lives in Tomsk [Siberia] and is a video blogger and a civil society activist. Tyumentsev is charged with committing crimes under Article 280, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Public incitement of extremism by means of the Internet”) and Article 282, part 1 (“Actions aimed at inciting hatred or enmity, and also at degrading the dignity of a person or group of people by gender, race, ethnicity, language, heritage or relations to religion, or their membership of a social group”). Tyumentsev has been in custody since 28 April 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted in relation to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the nature of the charges laid against him.

  1. Udaltsov, Sergei Stanislavovich (b. 16 April 1977)

Udaltsov was a member of the Coordinating Council of the Opposition and a leader of the Left Front. After the propaganda film “Anatomy of a Protest-2” aired on the NTV channel, Udaltsov was sentenced to four years and 6 months of imprisonment in a general-regime penal colony under Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 212, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Preparing to organise riots”) and Article 212, part 1 (“Organising riots”). Udaltsov was under house arrest from 9 February 2013 until being taken into custody on 24 July 2014.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and the disproportionate use of pre-trial detention.

  1. Valiyev, Rushat Rashitovich (b. 8 April 1982)

He is a member of the banned organisation Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. Valiyev was sentenced to six years in a strict-regime penal colony, with a further one year of restricted freedom and a fine of 150,000 roubles, on charges of crimes under Article 205.1, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Incitement and other involvement of people in committing a crime envisaged under Art.278 of the Russian Criminal Code”), Article 30, part 1 (“Preparing actions aimed at a violent seizure of power, or the change by force of the constitutional order”), and Article 282.2, part 2 (“Participating in the activity of an extremist organisation”). Valiyev was convicted despite the fact that the prosecution accepted he did not take part in any acts of violence. He has been in custody since 31 July 2012.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the charges laid against him.

  1. Vakhitov, Linar Munirovich (b. 25 April 1983)

At the time of his detention he was director of the company StroiAlyans and a leader of the human rights organization Movement for the Rights of Muslims. He is a resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at the violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts he did not take part in any acts of violence. Vakhitov has been in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the nature of the charges laid against him.

  1. Yakupov, Ural Gaifullovich (b. 24 May 1991)

He is a resident of Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District] and works as a repairer of household appliances. He has been charged under Article 205.5, part 2, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Taking part in the activities of an organization designated as terrorist under Russian law”) and Article 30, part 1, in conjunction with Article 278 (“Preparing actions aimed at the violent seizure of power or the change by force of the constitutional order”) as a member of the banned organization Hizb ut- Tahrir al-Islami. This is despite the fact that the prosecution accepts that Yakupov did not take part in any acts of violence. Yakupov has been held in custody since 4 February 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted on the basis of an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of the right to fair trial and disproportionate use of pre-trial detention, given the nature of the charges laid against him.

  1. Zagreyev, Robert Raufanovich (b. 3 July 1964)

He is a resident of the city of Ufa in Bashkortostan [Volga Federal District]. He is a journalist and a politician in opposition to the current government. He was sentenced to three years in prison in a strict- regime penal colony on charges of crimes under Article 205.2, part 1, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Public incitement to acts of terrorism”). Zagreev was under house arrest from 27 April 2015, and in custody from 29 October 2015.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution was conducted exclusively with respect to his peaceful exercise of his right to freedom of expression of opinion, on a charge of an alleged offence that in fact did not take place, with violation of the right to fair trial.

  1. Zhitenev, Igor Anatolievich (b. 27 April 1967)

He is a, former ataman of the National Cultural Autonomy of Cossacks of Novokhopersky district in Voronezh Region [Central Russia], and an activist in the movement “In Defence of Khoper”. Zhitenev is charged with committing a crime under Article 163, part 3, point “b”, of the Russian Criminal Code (“Extortion committed for the purpose of obtaining property on a particularly large scale”). Zhitenev has been in custody since 26 November 2013.

Recognized as a political prisoner on the grounds that his prosecution is being conducted in relation to an alleged offence that did not in fact take place, with violation of his right to a fair trial.

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